Saturday, 1 November 2014

Link feast

This Is What A Panic Attack Physically Feels Like
Descriptions from people who experience panic attacks are accompanied by illustrations of their experiences.

Magic May Lurk Inside Us All
"Several streams of research in psychology, neuroscience and philosophy are converging on an uncomfortable truth: We’re more susceptible to magical thinking than we’d like to admit."

A Mug of Cocoa is Not a Cure For Memory Problems
The headlines said new research showed a cup of hot cocoa could give elderly people the memory of a person in their 30s. The NHS Choices website takes an expert look at the study results and finds quite a different story.

We Are All Confident Idiots
Thomas Jefferson had it right, argues psychologist David Dunning at the Pacific Standard, someone "who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors".

Camps, Conflict and Collectivism
Sixty years after the famous Robbers Cave Boys' Camp study - "one of the most significant psychological experiments ever conducted" - Stephen Reicher and Alexander Haslam at The Psychologist magazine introduce an appreciation of its architect, Muzafer Sherif. (By the way, The Psychologist has a brand new website - check it out.)

Music In the Eye of The Beholder
Over at the Psychonomic Society's new blog, Melissa Vo reports on new research showing how listening to music "seems to turn us into less active visual explorers".

Is Social Psychology Biased Against Conservatives?
Maria Konnikova outlines multiple strands of evidence suggesting that social psychology is biased against conservatives and conservative ideas. The introduction of blind peer-review may be one part of the solution.

Most Autistic People Have Normal Brain Anatomy
Neuroskeptic reports on a large neuroimaging study that found few differences between the brains of people with autism and healthy controls. The result "threatens to turn the world of autism neuroscience upside down," he writes.

Pregnancy Doesn’t Actually Make Women Dumber
New York Magazine's Science of Us website publishes an excerpt from the new book Great Myths of the Brain.

What Do Animals Think They See When They Look in the Mirror?
Chelsea Wald at Slate compares the reactions of different animal to their own reflections.
Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.


Research Digest said...

"The area is associated with emotional language processing, such as interpreting expressive gestures, so this may suggest that experts are attending more deeply to the emotional currents of text and their ideas." This is an interesting thought and I think the connection between the expert's and the depth and creativity of their writing makes sense.
"One final finding: during brainstorming, expert brains showed increased activation relative to novices in several regions associated with speech production. Taking these findings together, they paint a picture of expert creative writers: ideas bubble within them, already on the road from concept to expression, readily communicable, almost rising into their throats. These are handled by neural systems streamlined to take care of the basics, while the writer devotes greater attention to the emotional interpretation of their text." I think the already developed ideas of the experienced and expert writers links them to having more creativity and the ability for them to push their writing to the next step. I find this article very interesting and am excited to hear more about it in the future.

Research Digest said...

Synesthesia in color of fMRI at present time,the dark side of one's mind could be recorded too.

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