Saturday, 26 July 2014

Link feast

Our pick of the best psychology and neuroscience links from the past week:

Getting Over Procrastination
Maria Konnikova with an overview of some fascinating genetic research.

The End of ‘Genius’
"[T]he lone genius is a myth that has outlived its usefulness" writes Joshua Shenk.

Do You Need a Mental Health First Aider in The Office?
Mental health "first aider" Charlotte Walker explains her role.

Won’t They Help?
Dwyer Gunn for Aeon magazine looks at new programmes that are using psychological insights to combat the Bystander Phenomenon.

Dude, Where’s My Frontal Cortex?
Robert Sapolsky describes the advantages and disadvantages of the "unique" teenage brain.

Hundreds of Genes and Link to Immune System Found in Largest Genetic Schizophrenia Study
Michael O'Donovan explains the implications of the findings from the recent study he co-authored.

What’s Up With That: Why Does Sleeping In Just Make Me More Tired?
Nick Stockton for WIRED on the perils of too much sleep.

How Tests Make Us Smarter
Psychologist Henry L. Roediger III on the implications of his findings for educational policy.

Detecting Dementia: The First Steps Towards Dignity
Tania Browne explains why in future opticians may have an important role to play in detecting dementia.

Is One of the Most Popular Psychology Experiments Worthless?
Olga Khazan at The Atlantic asks whether its time to retire the "trolley problem" used in so many moral psychology experiments.


Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.


Research Digest said...

People suffer from social experiments all the time, the institution of marriage is one of the most common forms of brutal suffering and humiliation.

Here we have something that you do to find out more about how some of those mechanisms work. And the beauty of this one is that when it's done you get to walk away from it and you've learned something meaningful about yourself.

Research Digest said...

Quick question, would this be related to the primacy and recency bias?

Post a Comment

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.